Papercut Patterns Stacker Jacket

Planning for this project started in 2019 when there was a flurry of great jacket patterns being launched and I decided it would be useful to own a smarter jacket for spring / autumn wear which was still reasonably casual enough to fit in with my wardrobe.

After eyeing up the many lovely options I finally decided on the Papercut Patterns Stacker jacket

As you can see most of the jackets I liked are a similar silhouette but I was drawn to the big pockets,yoke and collar of the Papercut Patterns Stacker Jacket. Plus I wanted a corduroy jacket which the model was helpfully wearing ( I also saw some great versions on line)

I bought the fabric and notions in one go at the Knitting and Stitching show in autumn 2019. It always helps if I have a focused purchase intention when I go to these shows as it helps curtail ( but doesn’t entirely stop!) numerous random purchases to add to the stash.

I already had a fairly clear of the required fabric – a wide whale corduroy in a neurotransmitter colour footprint maximum flexibility. The taupe corduroy I found was perfect. I then bought a mauve lining fabric, perfectly matched mauve buttons ( from the Button Queen) and finally some lightweight thin wadding / batting. I bought this from what I think was probably a patchwork supply stall. My idea was to make the jacket slightly warmer by using this.

After cutting out the jacket and lining , I cut out an additional lining from the wadding and attached it to the lining just inside the seam line so that the wadding and lining could be handled as one layer in the construction process.

You can see the wadding and lining in the photo below ( front of jacket)


One of my biggest fears in construction was that my sewing machine would not cope with the multiple layers. The collar construction required sewing through 3 layers of corduroy,2 interfacing, 1 lining and 1 wadding

Attaching the collar

Thankfully it copes at this point


It was when the jacket was almost finished that I hit my only problem

Towards end of construction modelled by Ariel

I will admit I was concerned about the buttonholes ! So much so that I decided to trial one on scrap fabric – which confirmed that I had a problem. The machine struggled with the thickness, and I think the corduroy ribbing, and would not run smoothly using my automated button hole maker. It just seems to get stuck part way through. So I tried using paper between the lesser foot and the fabric, which seemed to help to create a successful sample button hole.

So on to the garment, and of course the first button hole completely messed up about three quarters of the way through. I have no photos of this – I think I was too distressed to operate the iPhone!

There followed a long agonising and careful unpicking of the stitching ( I didn’t want to ruin the front of my almost finished jacket). I’m sure many of you have been there, done that!!!

Luckily there was no major damage – but I still needed a solution to buttonholes / fastening.

So my solution has been to use giant poppers and then just sew the buttons on for decorative purposes.

If any of you have any suggestions of other routes I could have gone – let me know in the comments. Always useful for next time!


I love this jacket. It’s turned out just as I had pictured it ( well without the buttonholes!) and despite the restrictions of 2020 it’s already had a few outings.

2 thoughts on “Papercut Patterns Stacker Jacket”

  1. I’ve been thinking along the same lines you were, so it was really helpful to read your post about your Stacker jacket. It turned out great, and I love your snap/popper idea under the buttons. I wouldn’t change it–it’s brilliant. I’ll continue to think over your review as I contemplate making a jacket of my own. Thanks for showing the jackets you considered, too. I have looked at all of those at various points, and I found it really helpful to see them all in one place with the jacket pattern you ended up choosing. Great jacket, and very helpful blog post!

    Like

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